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Domestic Violence Resources In Asia

Asia: Rampant Domestic Violence Is Linked to Cultural Trends


The underlying factors driving this surge in domestic violence are manifold, rooted in a complex interplay of economic insecurity, social isolation, and cultural norms. With many individuals facing job losses or reduced working hours, financial stressors have intensified, exacerbating tensions within households and fueling arguments over finances.


Domestic Violence Resources Across World Regions

Moreover, the anxiety and stress wrought by the pandemic, coupled with prolonged periods of confinement, have created fertile ground for frustrations to boil over into acts of violence. The inability to escape abusive environments due to lockdown measures has further compounded the vulnerability of survivors, trapping them in cycles of abuse with limited avenues for recourse.


Domestic Violence Resources In Asia
Domestic Violence Resources In Asia

Tragically, women bear the brunt of this crisis in Asia, with a disproportionate number of victims enduring the scourge of domestic violence. In China, 80% of domestic violence victims are women, while in India, the figure rises to a staggering 90%. Cultural attitudes that prioritize male authority and female subordination perpetuate a culture of silence and stigma surrounding domestic violence, rendering women less likely to speak out or seek help.


Domestic Violence Resources


Addressing the root causes of domestic violence in Asia requires a multi-faceted approach that encompasses legal reforms, economic empowerment initiatives, and cultural sensitization efforts. Empowering women to assert their rights and challenge gender norms is crucial to shifting entrenched attitudes and fostering a culture of respect and equality within households and communities.


Furthermore, investment in support services, including hotlines, shelters, and counseling programs, is essential to provide survivors with the resources and support they need to break free from the cycle of abuse and rebuild their lives.


As we confront the silent crisis of domestic violence in Asia, let us stand in solidarity with survivors, amplify their voices, and advocate for systemic change. By challenging cultural norms, promoting gender equality, and fostering a culture of empathy and respect, we can create a future where every individual is free from the shackles of violence and oppression.


Afghanistan

Women

Afghan Women’s Resource Center


phone: +93 799 203 056


phone: +93 700 280 179


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Armenia

Women

Azerbaijan


Children (under 18)

Other

phone: 99 412 408 5696

Bahrain

Women & Children (under 18)

Bangladesh


Women

Abuse Helpline

phone: 966 4699

Bhutan

Women & Children (under 18)

Information Centre for Women and Children


phone: (975) 2 332159/334751

Brunei


Women

Abuse Helpline

phone: 673 340524

Cambodia

Women

China

Children (under 18)

Child Abuse Hotline


phone: 12338

Women

Red Maple


phone: 010-68333388

Men

Red Maple


phone: 010-68333388

Older Adults (over 60)

Red Maple


phone: 010-68333388

India

Children (under 18)

Childline


phone: 1098

Women

Men

Men Helpline


phone: +91-9911666498

Older Adults (over 60)

The Dignity Foundation


phone: 18002678780

Indonesia

Children (under 18)

Indonesian Commission for the Protection of Children


phone: 129

Women

Men

The UN Refugee Agency


phone: +​​62 811 1000 424

Older Adults (over 60)

Emergency Line


phone: 112

Iran

Everyone

Iraq

Women

Organization of Women’s Freedom in Iraq


phone: 110


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Israel

Women

WAVO


phone: 1202


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Japan

Women

Women’s Resource Center


phone: 092 513 7333

Jordan

Women

Kyrgyzstan

Abuse Helpline

phone: 281 455

Laos

Domestic Violence Helpline

phone: 1362

Lebanon

Women

Myanmar

Women

Nepal

Women

Saudi Arabia

Everyone

MLSD 24-hour domestic violence helpline


phone: 1919

Singapore

Women

Aware


phone: 18007775555

South Korea 

Women

Sri Lanka

Everyone

CCCLine


phone: 1333


phone: 94 11 4 715585

Taiwan

Everyone

113 Protection Hotline


phone: 113

Tajikistan

Everyone

Project on Prevention of Domestic Violence


phone: (91) 1892 221 527/198

Thailand

Children (under 18)

phone 1387

Everyone

Social Help Centre


phone: 1300

phone: 02 276 2950

Timor-Leste

Abuse Helpline

phone: 390 321 534

Turkey

Children (under 18)

Emergency Domestic Violence Hotline


phone: +90 212 656 9696


Social Service Counseling Line


phone: 183

Women

Emergency Domestic Violence Hotline


phone: +90 212 656 9696


Social Service Counseling Line


phone: 183

Men

Emergency Domestic Violence Hotline


phone: +90 212 656 9696


Social Service Counseling Line


phone: 183

Older Adults (over 60)

Emergency Domestic Violence Hotline


phone: +90 212 656 9696


Social Service Counseling Line


phone: 183

Vietnam

Children (under 18)

Women

Abuse Helpline

CSAGA Gender Violence Hotline


phone: 024 3333 55 99phone: (971) 34 36/31 43

Yemen

Everyone


How can I tell if someone is being abused?

Recognizing and responding to signs of abuse is crucial in providing support to those who may be in danger. Here’s a summary of the steps you can take to help someone you suspect is being abused:

  • Be observant: Pay attention to subtle signs such as isolation from friends and family, financial control, and reluctance to discuss their relationship.

  • Listen without judgment: Offer a supportive ear and avoid pressuring the victim to take action. Understand that leaving an abusive situation can be complex and dangerous.

  • Make an anonymous report: If you witness or suspect ongoing abuse, don’t hesitate to call the authorities. Your intervention could save a life.

  • Reach out to support services: Refer the victim to organizations equipped to handle cases of abuse. These services can provide guidance and assistance while respecting confidentiality.

  • Avoid contact with the abuser: Refrain from confronting the perpetrator directly. Leave intervention to trained professionals to ensure the safety of everyone involved.

  • Maintain confidentiality: Respect the privacy of the victim by keeping any disclosures or reports confidential. Avoid sharing details on social media, as it could compromise the victim’s safety.

By following these steps, you can offer vital support to those experiencing abuse while minimizing risks to yourself and the victim. Remember that your actions can make a difference in helping someone escape a dangerous situation.


Violence Prevention and Self Defense Techniques

The Center for Violence Prevention and Self Defense (CVPSD) is a non profit 501(C)(3) with a mission to stop violence by educating at-risk people and empower them with the skills needed to protect themselves by providing online and live training. 


Through workshops and seminars we educate participants about violence prevention and guide them on assessing risk factors while establishing boundaries in relationships. Additionally practical self defense classes equip people with hands on skills and effective strategies to prevent and intervene in cases of assault. CVPSD reaches individuals and communities through partnerships with schools and other nonprofits, community groups, as well as classes for the public.

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